Shakespeare’s Birds, a Presentation by the Los Angeles Audubon Society

Audubon SocietyThe Los Angeles Audubon Society has an upcoming event of interest for Shakespeare lovers on Thursday, April 9th. Dr. Martin Hyatt, a biologist with degrees from Harvard University and the University of Pittsburgh, will offer a free presentation entitled, Shakespeare’s Birds. Dr. Hyatt has tracked radio-tagged homing pigeons from a small plane, chased down gorged albatrosses from an inflatable boat, found roadrunners in the mountains, and observed penguins in the desert. Now, he pursues Shakespeare’s birds.

William Shakespeare often used bird imagery in his works, drawing upon renaissance, medieval, Roman, Greek, and biblical sources in addition to his own experiences. For his time, he was quite the birder, mentioning over 60 species in his plays and poems. Shakespeare was also famously compared to birds. At the beginning of his career, he was labeled an “upstart crow,” and after his death, he was eulogized as the “swan of Avon.” At times, Shakespeare used biologically accurate information; at others he referenced longstanding myths or drew from ancient fables. Understanding these literary traditions leads to some surprising discoveries about Shakespeare and his works.

Los Angeles Audubon’s monthly evening program presentations are held at the Audubon Center at Debs Park from 7:30 – 9:30 pm. Come early to enjoy the nature and share your birding interests with like-minded birders. Everyone is welcome.

SHAKESPEARE’S BIRDS
with Dr. Martin Hyatt
Audubon Center at Debs Park
4700 North Griffin Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90031
For more information: (323) 221-2255
Directions and parking: http://debspark.audubon.org/visit-us
Click Here for more information about the event

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: Shakespeare’s Birds, a Presentation by the Los Angeles Audubon Society | The Shakespeare Standard

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