UCLA Conference: Entertaining the Idea: Shakespeare, Philosophy, Performance – Key Words

UCLA Conference

The UCLA Center for 17th- & 18th-Century Studies is holding a conference October 7 – 8, 2016 that you may find interesting. Entertaining the Idea: Shakespeare, Philosophy, Performance – Conference 1: Key Words. Organizers: Julia Reinhard Lupton (UC, Irvine), Lowell Gallagher (UCLA), James Kearney (UCSB).

Course Description
To entertain is to delight and amuse but also to receive guests and hence to court risk, from the real dangers of rape, murder, or jealousy to the more intangible exhilaration of self-disclosure and captivation in response to another. To entertain an idea is to welcome a compelling thought or beckoning fiction into the disinhibited zone of speculative play.

“I’ll entertain the offer’d fallacy,” says Antipholus of Syracuse as he abandons himself to the comedy of errors. Like Antipholus, readers of fictions and viewers of plays entertain “themes” and “dreams” on their way to recognition and new knowledge as a mode of testing the significance and reach of the thought-things and person-problems, encountered in a world co-created by their imaginative participation.

Entertaining the Idea: Shakespeare, Philosophy, Performance will stage a series of encounters between performance and philosophy in Shakespearean drama, encounters designed both to illumine the plays in their poetic and theatrical amplitude and to explore what philosophy and performance might offer each other in 21st-century literary studies.

The aim is to take up drama’s capacity to enhance experience, extend attention, exercise judgment, test existential limits, and assert common bonds. Key words in this enterprise include entertainment, acting, acknowledgement, hospitality, and ways of life, concepts explored in the opening conference.

Some of the speakers and topics explored during the two-day conference include:

Sarah Beckwith, Duke University
Late Have I Loved You

Lowell Gallagher, UCLA, and Bruce Smith, USC
Roundtable: Philosophy and/or/as Entertainment in The Winter’s Tale

Sheiba Kian Kaufman, Ahmanson-Getty Fellow
Acting in a Hospitable Temporality: Paradigms of Capacity-Building and Transformation

James Kearney, UC, Santa Barbara
Hospitality

Jeffrey Knapp, UC, Berkeley
Entertainment

James Kuzner, Brown University
Shakespeare as a Way of Life

Phil Thompson, UC, Irvine
Speaking Shakespeare: A Workshop

Tzachi Zamir, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Acting

The conference will also host a roundtable with Ahmanson-Getty Fellows and graduate students from UC campuses who will share their research plans and projects in response to the key words explored.

Entertaining the Idea: Shakespeare, Philosophy, Performance
Friday, October 7, 2016 (10am – 5pm)
Saturday, October 8, 2016 (10am – 1pm)
Royce Hall, Room 314 on the UCLA campus
10745 Dickson Plaza
More info and registration
Admission is Free for all students (with ID), Center & Clark Affiliated Faculty, and UC faculty and staff; and $20 for the General Public.
UCLA Campus Parking Information

The conference is co-sponsored by the UCLA Office of Interdisciplinary & Cross Campus Affairs; UCLA Department of English; UCI Shakespeare Center

UCLA’s conference core program events will continue in 2017 with two additional events.

Cut Him Out in Little Stars: Romeo and Juliet in Diaspora
January 20 & 21, 2017

First Philosophy, Last Judgments: The Lear Real
April 28 & 29, 2017

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: UCLA Conference: Entertaining the Idea: Shakespeare, Philosophy, Performance – Key Words | The Shakespeare Standard

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